Title

Association of the functional movement screen with injuries in division I athletes

Department

Athletic Training

Document Type

Article

Publication Source

Journal of Sport Rehabilitation

Publication Date

2015-01-01

Volume

24

Issue

2

First Page

163

Last Page

170

Abstract

Context: The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) evaluates performance in 7 fundamental movement patterns using a 4-point scale. Previous studies have reported increased injury risk with a composite score (CS) of 14/21 or less; these studies were limited to specific sports and injury definition. Objective: To examine the association between FMS CS and movement pattern scores and acute noncontact and overuse musculoskeletal injuries in division I college athletes. An exploratory objective was to assess the association between injury and FMS movement pattern asymmetry. Design: Prospective cohort. Setting: College athletic facilities. Participants: 167 injury-free, college basketball, football, volleyball, cross country, track and field, swimming/ diving, soccer, golf, and tennis athletes (males = 89). Intervention: The FMS was administered during preparticipation examination. Main Outcome Measure: Noncontact or overuse injuries that required intervention from the athletic trainer during the sport season. Results: FMS CS was not different between those injured (n = 74; 14.3 ± 2.5) and those not (14.1 ± 2.4; P = .57). No point on the ROC curve maximized sensitivity and specificity; therefore previously published cut-point was used for analysis with injury (≤14 [n = 92]). After adjustment, no statistically significant association between FMS CS and injury (odds ratio [OR] = 1.01, 95% CI 0.53-1.91) existed. Lunge was the only movement pattern that was associated with injury; those scoring 2 were less likely to have an injury vs those who scored 3 (OR = 0.21, 95% CI 0.08-0.59). There was also no association between FMS movement pattern asymmetry and injury. Conclusion: FMS CS, movement patterns, and asymmetry were poor predictors of noncontact and overuse injury in this cohort of division I athletes.

Keywords

FMS, Fundamental movement, Movement stability, Sports medicine

DOI

10.1123/jsr.2013-0141

https://doi.org/10.1123/jsr.2013-0141

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